Tue, Dec 17, 2019 2:00 PM EST - Register Now

1.5 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare (HSW) Learning Units.

Presenters:

Ben Brungraber, Ph.D, P.E. and co-founder, Fire Tower Engineered Timber, Delran, NJ
Jan Lewandoski, Timber Framer and Owner, Restoration and Traditional Building, Greensboro Bend, VT

Description:
From the Post-medieval frames of the First Period in American architecture through 18th and 19th century homes, churches and barns to elaborate post and beam contemporary homes and commercial buildings, timber framing is an enduring choice for structural strength, craftsmanship and aesthetic appeal throughout North America.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the history of timber frames found in American architectural styles and buildings.
  • Recognize differences between historic and contemporary framing practice including traditional joinery techniques, design and mechanical connections.
  • Consider the impact of load and code requirements for reusing historic timber frame buildings and building new timber frame residential and commercial buildings.
  • Discuss tools, wood species and selected truss designs.

Register today for this free webinar.

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Sponsored by:

MossCreek

Buying Guide Spotlight

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Timberlane, Inc.

Manufacturer of custom exterior shutters: more than 40 historically accurate, customizable styles; available in premium woods & our own maintenance-free Endurian, along with the large selection of period shutter hardware and garage doors.

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